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Book Review

Publisher's Note:

Seemingly nothing in this world daunts the young criminal mastermind Artemis Fowl. In the fairy world, however, there is a small thing that has gotten under his skin on more than one occasion: Opal Koboi. In The Last Guardian, the evil pixie is wreaking havoc yet again. This time his arch rival has reanimated dead fairy warriors who were buried in the grounds of Fowl Manor. Their spirits have poss…

Overall Book Review:

The Artemis Fowl Series is one of my treasured favorites.  From book 1, Artemis Fowl has included an enthralling mix of magic, science, humor, and clever plot twists.  Artemis Fowl: The Last Guardian, the final Artemis Fowl book, continues this tradition, ensuring that the series ends with a bang, and surprisingly, a few moments that will tug at the heart strings of any Artemis Fowl fan.  But this is amid the wild action of magic and science combined, creating a intense and thrilling mix.  However, one of my favorite details of this book is the comeback and surprising heroism of Mulch, the dwarf, which is guaranteed to make you laugh out loud. The Last Guardian is a fitting finish for Artemis Fowl.


Content Analysis:

Profanity/Language Rating: 1 religous exclamation, 6 mild obscenities.

Violence/Gore Rating: A hostage is executed, some description is included; there are several fight scenes involving knives, guns, fists, fantasy creatures and explosions resulting in injury or death; several characters are possessed; one character is stabbed to death; several characters are vaporized.

Sex/Nudity Rating: 1 instance of a nude dwarf with no description.

Mature Subject Matter:

Clones, Death, Hostages.

Alcohol / Drug Use:

None

Overall Book Rating
Profanity/Language
Rating:
2
10
Violence/Gore
Rating:
5
10
Sex/Nudity
Rating:
1
10

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About the Reviewer

I enjoy reading adventure books like Gary Paulsen’s The Hatchet, probably because I like to lead an active life. Outside of reading, I camp, hike, run cross country and work on a farm, and a lot of these experiences let me appreciate the content of a good book, as well as the unlimited possibilities that can happen between its covers.