Publisher's Note:  

The future is uncertain. The battle to control the past has begun. The final book in the riveting Hourglass Door trilogy begins when Abby steps through the black door, and she doesn't dare look back. Though it means leaving Dante—wounded, bleeding, and possibly blind—she knows it is the only way to save her family and stop Zo from manipulating the river of time and throwing the future into chaos. In the end, Abby must face a final confrontation that will take her to the very origins of the hourglass door.



The Forgotten Locket

by Lisa Mangum

Review Date:
10/27/2011

Recommended Age:
16+

Overall Rating:
****

Profanity / Language Rating:
**

Violence / Gore Rating:
******

Sex / Nudity Rating:
*

Overall Review:  

“This is where the story changes,” Valerie whispered to me from behind her hands.  “If Dante says yes, the story goes one way. If he says no…”

How often do we really think about the things we do and the decisions we make and how they will affect our future?  The whole focus of The Forgotten Locket are those itsy bitsy decisions that change the entire course of a lifetime: One small word, one seemingly insignificant look, changing your mind about where to go to lunch… It all matters and it can change everything!

I enjoyed following through with Abby and Dante.  There were definitely a lot of interesting twists and turns in this final installment!  My favorite character has to be Valerie (turned Oracle), as she just adds almost a comic relief to most of the story.  Abby and Dante’s relationship doesn’t change, even as they are fighting for their families and friends through time.  I enjoyed the unfolding story and loved the back and forth through time and meeting of so many new characters. 

I had very high expectations for this book (I really loved the first two!), but I felt like it fell a little short.  The writing is very different this time: there were a lot of big problems arising individually, then 20 pages later we hit a climax and resolution, and then we start all over again with a new big problem, climax, and resolution.  This goes through memory loss, insanity, love triangles, blindness, broken hearts, etc.  At times, it almost felt like a lot of mini stories on the lives and travels of Abby and Dante, but it worked.  I wondered if perhaps it was written this way on purpose—almost as a symbol of the river of time that was being diverted, polluted, frayed, and destroyed.  Everything was spiraling out of control bit by bit, one piece at a time.

On the whole, The Forgotten Locket provides a satisfying, albeit predictable, ending to The Hourglass Door Trilogy.  It makes you think twice about ever wanting to go back in time and change something… and one can only hope that time travel will never be achieved!


Content Analysis:  

There is one instance of profanity where a character tells others where to go.

All the sexual content is mild and includes some kissing and mild tension (with phrases like “She leaned against him and her body was a perfect fit”).

There is a great deal of violence and some of it became a bit more graphic, mostly to show the intensity of the feelings and the situations.  There is more description of the branding with chains around the wrists, and a lot of reviewing past violence from the previous novels (stabbings, deaths, etc.).  There is an evil and dangerous character who wreaks havoc wherever he goes and delights in it.  He steals away family members, threatens everyone (and follows through), constantly desires revenge and destruction of those opposing him, and wishes to destroy all time.  A character stabs another through the heart.  A character attacks using fingernails to claw at another’s face and draws blood (this happens multiple times).  There is a moderate fight between two characters that include fist-fighting, punching in the face, and stepping on fingers repeatedly in order to break them (and there is description of the state of the broken fingers and the mutilated face many times after).  Two characters break objects that are important to each other in order to incapacitate the other.  A character melts (not unlike the Wicked Witch in the Wizard of Oz) very slowly.



Mature Subject Matter:  

The mature themes are mostly mild, such as time travel, dealing with memory loss, overcoming odds, and realizing the importance of friends and family.  Some of the moderate themes deal with the evil nature of one of the characters: the overwhelming desire for revenge, destruction and death.



Alcohol / Drug Use:  

***



Reviewed By Emily
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